Wednesday, November 28, 2007

Tis a wee diss this unworkshop is - points and issues relating to the unworkshop on Teaching With Social Software Unworkshop

Here below are issues I was thinking about during (or even after) the unworkshop:

  • "Social" (why is it social?) networking may be a great tool for learning but the learning can go beyond any parameters that are set by the learners themselves or by any mentor/facilitator.
  • Learners will decide themselves whether they want to participate or not and this may be discouraging. However, it may draw out those who are really interested in the topic or issue at hand.
  • Social network learning may not actually produce quality because it is limited to participant experience, expertise, personal world view, etc... and the process also does not go through the academic rigourous washing machine.
  • The technology itself can act as a barrier to participation and therefore disempower those left out of the loop i.e. the poor, the technologically challenged.
To support the above points I leave you to enjoy this very short video file that some friends back home in Aotearoa/New Zealand made. It is aimed at Maori youth primarily those who want to learn their own culture and language. Can you guess the drawbacks of such an approach as this?





video

3 comments:

Owen James said...

Hi Tchansan,

Welcome! I hope that your comments encourage good discussion as more participants emerge over the next few days. Thanks for being first to post, I will respond later after others have had chance to comment.

Best, Owen.

Mr. Stout said...

Very interesting way to launch your blog. I'm not sure that I understand your first point. I agree that social networking may be cause for disappointment for some teachers due to the autonomy it affords, but this, as you said can equally be cause for great joy, as some students really get into it and interact with the language more than they do in the classroom setting. As for the point about academic rigour. Hmmmm, there is a time and a place for rigour and perhaps I'm hypocritical here since I'm meant to be an academic,but to be honest,rigour is mostly misused in the academy. Sorry for the cynicism. All learning is valuable - no matter what a grey beard might think.
That's all for now. Gotta have another think on this.
Cheers

Bern said...

Hi Tchansan

Just a note to thank you for getting our group started. I'm trying to catch up.